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NH4HCO3 gas-generating liposomal nanoparticle for photoacoustic imaging in breast cancer

Authors Xia J, Feng G, Xia X, Hao L, Wang Z

Received 23 May 2016

Accepted for publication 30 November 2016

Published 6 March 2017 Volume 2017:12 Pages 1803—1813

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IJN.S113366

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Akshita Wason

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Dr Linlin Sun


Jizhu Xia, Gang Feng, Xiaorong Xia, Lan Hao, Zhigang Wang

Chongqing Key Laboratory of Ultrasound Molecular Imaging, Department of Ultrasound, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China

Abstract: In this study, we have developed a biodegradable nanomaterial for photoacoustic imaging (PAI). Its biodegradation products can be fully eliminated from a living organism. It is a gas-generating nanoparticle of liposome-encapsulating ammonium bicarbonate (NH4HCO3) solution, which is safe, effective, inexpensive, and free of side effects. When lasers irradiate these nanoparticles, NH4HCO3 decomposes to produce CO2, which can absorb much of the light energy under laser irradiation with a specific wavelength, and then expand under heat to generate a thermal acoustic wave. An acoustic detector can detect this wave and show it as a photoacoustic signal on a display screen. The intensity of the photoacoustic signal is enhanced corresponding to an increase in time, concentration, and temperature. During in vivo testing, nanoparticles were injected into tumor-bearing nude mice through the caudal vein, and photoacoustic signals were detected from the tumor, reaching a peak in 4 h, and then gradually disappearing. There was no damage to the skin or subcutaneous tissue from laser radiation. Our developed gas-generating nanomaterial, NH4HCO3 nanomaterial, is feasible, effective, safe, and inexpensive. Therefore, it is a promising material to be used in clinical PAI.

Keywords: Photoacoustic tomography, CO2, NH4HCO3, contrast agent, cancer

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