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New insights into early intervention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with mild airflow limitation

Authors Sun Y, Zhou J

Received 14 February 2019

Accepted for publication 18 April 2019

Published 23 May 2019 Volume 2019:14 Pages 1119—1125

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S205382

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Amy Norman

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Prof. Dr. Chunxue Bai


Yilan Sun, Jianying Zhou

Department of Respiratory Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China

Abstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has become one of the major public health problems worldwide due to its high morbidity and mortality. Up until now, COPD is still under-diagnosed and under-treated, especially for mild or moderate patients. It is widely accepted that the majority of patients with COPD are in the early stages, yet this subpopulation is underestimated. In recent years, growing evidence indicates that substantial physiological and clinical abnormalities exist in patients with mild COPD compared with healthy controls. Furthermore, recent studies suggest that pharmacologic intervention in early COPD has the potential to alter clinical outcomes. The main objective of this review is to summarize recent research regarding the heterogeneous pathophysiology, clinical features, and treatment of mild and moderate COPD. We also discuss promising markers of disease progression, which may contribute to the development of precision medicine in early COPD.

Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, airflow limitation, early intervention, precision medicine

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