Back to Journals » Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management » Volume 4 » Issue 2

New approaches in the treatment of HIV/AIDS – focus on maraviroc and other CCR5 antagonists

Authors Hans P Schlecht, Sarah Schellhorn, Bruce J Dezube, Jeffrey M Jacobson

Published 11 April 2008 Volume 2008:4(2) Pages 473—485

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/TCRM.S1997

Hans P Schlecht1, Sarah Schellhorn2, Bruce J Dezube3, Jeffrey M Jacobson1

1Department of Medicine (Infectious Diseases), Hahnemann University Hospital, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Medicine, 3Department of Medicine (Hematology/Oncology), Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

Abstract: Treatment of HIV-1 infection has produced dramatic success for many patients. Nevertheless, viral resistance continues to limit the efficacy of currently available agents in many patients. The CCR5 antagonists are a new class of antiretroviral agents that target a necessary coreceptor for viral entry of many strains of HIV-1. Recently, the first agent within this class, maraviroc, was approved by a number of regulatory agencies, including the Food and Drug Administration. Herein we review the role of the CCR5 receptor in HIV-1 infection and potential methods to target it in anti-HIV-1 therapy. We review the various categories of agents and discuss specific agents that have progressed to clinical study. We discuss in detail the recently approved, first in class CCR5 antagonist, maraviroc, and discuss aspects of resistance to CCR5 antagonism and the potential role of CCR5 antagonism in the management of HIV-1 infection.

Keywords: CCR5, HIV-1 tropism, coreceptor, maraviroc, viral entry, chemokine receptor

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF] 

 

Readers of this article also read:

In vitro cytotoxicity of the ternary PAMAM G3–pyridoxal–biotin bioconjugate

Uram Ł, Szuster M, Gargasz K, Filipowicz A, Wałajtys-Rode E, Wołowiec S

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2013, 8:4707-4720

Published Date: 11 December 2013

Erratum

Rapidis A, Sarlis N, Lefebvre J-L, et al

Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management 2008, 4:1381-1381

Published Date: 5 December 2008

Review of docetaxel in the treatment of gastric cancer

Eric D Tetzlaff, Jonathan D Cheng, Jaffer A Ajani

Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management 2008, 4:999-1007

Published Date: 10 October 2008

Early ischemic CT changes before thrombolysis: The influence of age and diabetes mellitus

Lars Thomassen, Ulrike Waje-Andreassen, Halvor Naess

Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management 2008, 4:699-703

Published Date: 8 August 2008

Leuprorelin depot injection: patient considerations in the management of prostatic cancer

Zinelabidine Abouelfadel, E David Crawford

Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management 2008, 4:513-526

Published Date: 11 April 2008

Clinical studies with oral lipid based formulations of poorly soluble compounds

Dimitrios G Fatouros, Ditte M Karpf, Flemming S Nielsen, Anette Mullertz

Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management 2007, 3:591-604

Published Date: 15 September 2007

Bortezomib (Velcade™) in the treatment of multiple myeloma

Antonia Field-Smith, Gareth J Morgan, Faith E Davies

Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management 2006, 2:271-279

Published Date: 15 September 2006