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Neuropsychiatric symptoms and celiac disease

Authors Urban-Kowalczyk M, Śmigielski J, Gmitrowicz A

Received 8 June 2014

Accepted for publication 15 July 2014

Published 14 October 2014 Volume 2014:10 Pages 1961—1964

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S69039

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 5

Małgorzata Urban-Kowalczyk,1 Janusz Śmigielski,2 Agnieszka Gmitrowicz3

1Affective and Psychotic Disorders Department, Medical University of Łódź, Łódź, Poland; 2Department of Geriatric Medicine Medical University of Łódź, Łódź, Poland; 3Department of Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Łódź, Łódź, Poland

Background: Neuropsychiatric symptoms may represent an atypical manifestation of celiac disease that occur before a gastroenterological diagnosis is made. Some studies suggest that a gluten-free diet is effective in treating the depression, anxiety, and neurological complications associated with celiac disease.
Method: The article describes the case of a patient suffering from chronic, treatment-resistant symptoms of depression and anxiety. The diagnosis of celiac disease and introduction of an elimination diet caused a significant improvement in mental state and everyday functioning in the presenting patient.
Conclusion: The presence of persistent anxiety and depressive symptoms, with a poor reaction to pharmacological treatment, indicates a need to identify somatic reasons for the underlying condition. It is important to remember that celiac disease can occur at any age, not only in childhood. The presence of this somatic cause of persistent depressive and anxiety symptoms should be considered in the diagnostic process in adults.

Keywords: gluten, depression, anxiety, anemia, neurological complications

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