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Neonatal bilateral lidocaine administration into the ventral hippocampus caused postpubertal behavioral changes: An animal model of neurodevelopmental psychopathological disorders

Authors Blas-Valdivia V, Cano-Europa E, Hernández-García A, Ortiz-Butron R

Published 2 December 2008 Volume 2009:5 Pages 15—22

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S4340

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2


Vanessa Blas-Valdivia, Edgar Cano-Europa, Adelaida Hernández-García, Rocio Ortiz-Butrón

Departamento de Fisiología “Mauricio Russek Berman”, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, I.P.N., Carpio y Plan de Ayala, México

Abstract: Our aim was to investigate if neonatal bilateral administration of lidocaine into the ventral hippocampus would cause behavioral changes related to schizophrenia. A neonatal ventral-hippocampal lesion (nVH lesion) was made with lidocaine in Wistar male pups. Two groups were formed, the first received lidocaine (4 μg/0.3 μL) and the second an equal volume of vehicle. At day 35 and 56, both groups were tested for social contact, immobility caused by clamping the neck and dorsal immobility, locomotor activity in an open field, and tail flick (TF) latency after a painful heat stimulus. All animals were then killed. Coronal cuts (7 μm) of the brain were obtained and each brain section was stained with cresyl violet-eosin. The animals which received the nVH lesion with lidocaine had decreased social interaction at both ages. The rats with lesions, only at day 58 postnatal, increased their distance traveled and ambulatory time, with a decrease in their nonambulatory and reset time. The rats with lesions had a longer duration of immobility caused by clamping the neck and a longer dorsal immobility at both days 34 and 57 compared to control rats. The lidocaine-treated group spent less time to deflect the tail compared to the control group at postpubertal age. The neonatal bilateral administration of lidocaine into the ventral hippocampus caused some alterations, such as chromatin condensation, nucleolus loss, and cell shrinkage, but glial proliferation was not seen. Neonatal bilateral lidocaine administration into the ventral hippocampus caused postpubertal behavioral changes.

Keywords: lidocaine, hippocampus, neonatal lesion, behavior, animal model, psychopathological disorders

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