Back to Journals » Pediatric Health, Medicine and Therapeutics » Volume 6

Acute respiratory infections in young Ethiopian children

Authors Harris RA

Received 27 March 2015

Accepted for publication 31 March 2015

Published 23 July 2015 Volume 2015:6 Pages 121—122

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/PHMT.S85573

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Editor who approved publication: Professor Laurens Holmes, Jr


Rebecca Arden Harris

Department of Family and Social Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA

The identification of risk factors for acute respiratory infections (ARI) is crucial for designing interventions to both minimize transmission and augment the immune response, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa where poverty-related ARI is still a major cause of preventable death in young children.1 I therefore read with interest Geberetsadik et al’s recent study of the factors associated with ARI in Ethiopian children.2 Their study uses nationally representative data on households and individuals to build a model of the social, demographic, and anthropometric determinants of ARI. A precise understanding of their model, however, requires clarification of several items in their paper.

View original paper by Geberetsadik et al.

Dear editor

The identification of risk factors for acute respiratory infections (ARI) is crucial for designing interventions to both minimize transmission and augment the immune response, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa where poverty-related ARI is still a major cause of preventable death in young children.1 I therefore read with interest Geberetsadik et al’s recent study of the factors associated with ARI in Ethiopian children.2 Their study uses nationally representative data on households and individuals to build a model of the social, demographic, and anthropometric determinants of ARI. A precise understanding of their model, however, requires clarification of several items in their paper. I am grateful to the authors for their willingness to respond to the following: 1) the total number of observations reported in Table 1 (10,808) differs from the total reported in the text (11,645); 2) the percentage of missing values in some of the predictor variables seem substantial (eg, ~17% in weight-for-age Z-score) raising the possibility of biased estimates; 3) the 95% confidence interval reported in Table 2 for fathers with tertiary education (0.2–1.0) differs from the 95% confidence interval reported in the text (0.2–0.6); and 4) the note to Table 2 would seem to indicate a significance level set at P<0.005 for the multivariable model whereas the text states P<0.05.

The supplemental information will help ensure an accurate reading of the methods and findings of this valuable study.

Disclosure

The author has no conflicts of interest in this communication.


References

1.

Nair H, Simões EA, Rudan I, et al. Global and regional burden of hospital admissions for severe acute lower respiratory infections in young children in 2010: a systematic analysis. Lancet. 2013;381(9875):1380–1390.

2.

Geberetsadik A, Worku A, Berhane Y. Factors associated with acute respiratory infection in children under the age of 5 years: evidence from the 2011 Ethiopia Demographic and Health Survey. Pediatric Health, Medicine and Therapeutics. 2015;6:9–13.


Authors’ reply

Achamyelesh Geberetsadik1, Alemayehu Worku2, Yemane Berhane3

1School of Public and Environmental Health, Hawassa University, Hawassa, Ethiopia; 2School of Public Health, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; 3Addis Continental Institute of Public Health, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Correspondence: Achamyelesh Geberetsadik, Hawassa University, PO Box 46, Hawassa, Ethiopia, Tel +251 91 130 3128, Email agtsadik@gmail.com


Dear editor

Our response, using the same numbering, follows:

1) 11,645 is the total number of children included in the study but after excluding the missing data for some variables, 10,808 is the total size included in analysis. This is indicated in the text. 2) Since the sample size is very big, the bias introduced will be minimal. Moreover, there is no significant difference in the background characteristics of those children with missing values and without missing values. This ensures that the effect of the missing values on the result is insignificant. 3) This was a typing error, the 95% confidence interval is 0.2–1.0. 4) This was a typing error, the significant level is P<0.05.

Disclosure

The authors report no competing interests in this communication.

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]