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Nanomedicine in pulmonary delivery

Authors Heidi M Mansour, Yun-Seok Rhee, Xiao Wu

Published 7 December 2009 Volume 2009:4 Pages 299—319

DOI https://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJN.S4937

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3

Heidi M Mansour, Yun-Seok Rhee, Xiao Wu

University of Kentucky, College of Pharmacy, Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences-Drug Development Division, Lexington, KY, USA

Abstract: The lung is an attractive target for drug delivery due to noninvasive administration via inhalation aerosols, avoidance of first-pass metabolism, direct delivery to the site of action for the treatment of respiratory diseases, and the availability of a huge surface area for local drug action and systemic absorption of drug. Colloidal carriers (ie, nanocarrier systems) in pulmonary drug delivery offer many advantages such as the potential to achieve relatively uniform distribution of drug dose among the alveoli, achievement of improved solubility of the drug from its own aqueous solubility, a sustained drug release which consequently reduces dosing frequency, improves patient compliance, decreases incidence of side effects, and the potential of drug internalization by cells. This review focuses on the current status and explores the potential of colloidal carriers (ie, nanocarrier systems) in pulmonary drug delivery with special attention to their pharmaceutical aspects. Manufacturing processes, in vitro/in vivo evaluation methods, and regulatory/toxicity issues of nanomedicines in pulmonary delivery are also discussed.

Keywords: pulmonary delivery, colloidal carriers, nanocarrier systems, liposome, polymeric nanoparticle, solid lipid nanoparticle, submicron emulsion, dendrimer

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