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Morbidity and associated factors of depressive disorder in patients with lung cancer

Authors Lee Y, Lin PY, Lin MC, Wang CC, Lu HI, Chen YC, Chong MY, Hung CF

Received 27 September 2018

Accepted for publication 21 July 2019

Published 9 August 2019 Volume 2019:11 Pages 7587—7596

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CMAR.S188926

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Ms Justinn Cochran

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Beicheng Sun


Yu Lee,1 Pao-Yen Lin,1 Meng-Chih Lin,2 Chin-Chou Wang,2 Hung-I Lu,3 Yung-Che Chen,2 Mian-Yoon Chong,4 Chi-Fa Hung1

1Department of Psychiatry, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 3Department of Cardiothoracic Vascular Surgery, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 4Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi, and Chang Gung University School of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan

Objective: The aim of this study was to assess morbidity and associated factors in patients with lung cancer (LC).
Methods: This study used a cross-sectional design with consecutive sampling. Study subjects were recruited from the LC outpatient clinic and inpatient ward in a medical center from March 2016 to February 2018. Patients with LC were enrolled and assessed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, Brief Fatigue Inventory, Numeric Pain Rating Scale, and the List of Threatening Experiences Questionnaire.
Results: One hundred and four patients were included in the study. The most prevalent psychiatric disorder was depressive disorder (25.0%), followed by adjustment disorder (17.3%), alcohol use disorder (3.8%), and insomnia disorder (3.8%). Fifty percent of patients had a psychiatric diagnosis. Using logistic regression analysis, it was found that severity of fatigue (OR=1.77; 95% CI, 1.03–3.03; p<0.05), severity of stressor (OR=14.14; 95% CI, 2.49–80.20; p<0.05), and severity of anxiety (OR=3.75; 95% CI, 1.87–7.54; p<0.001) were three significant associated factors. Patient health problems, death of a close family member or friend, and major financial crisis were the three most common stressors among our cancer patients.
Conclusion: Use of a standardized structured interview for early diagnosis and treatment of cancer patients with depressive disorder is crucial and might increase their quality of life.

Keywords: depression, morbidity, associated factors, lung cancer

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