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Monitoring human papillomavirus prevalence in urine samples: a review

Authors Enerly E, Olofsson C, Nygård M

Received 31 October 2012

Accepted for publication 28 December 2012

Published 12 March 2013 Volume 2013:5(1) Pages 67—79

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CLEP.S39799

Checked for plagiarism Yes

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Peer reviewer comments 5


Espen Enerly, Cecilia Olofsson, Mari Nygård

Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway

Abstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main cause of cervical cancer, and many countries now offer vaccination against HPV to girls by way of government-funded national immunization programs. Monitoring HPV prevalence in adolescents could offer a near-term biological measure of vaccine impact, and urine sampling may be an attractive large-scale method that could be used for this purpose. Our objective was to provide an overview of the literature on HPV DNA detection in urine samples, with an emphasis on adolescents. We searched the PubMed database using the terms “HPV” and “urine” and identified 21 female and 14 male study populations in which HPV prevalence in urine samples was reported, four of which included only asymptomatic female adolescents. We provide herein an overview of the recruitment setting, age, urine sampling procedure, lesion type, HPV assay, and HPV prevalence in urine samples and other urogenital samples for the studies included in this review. In female study populations, concordance for any HPV type and type-specific concordance in paired urine and cervical samples are provided in addition to sensitivity and specificity. We concluded that few studies on HPV prevalence in urine samples have been performed in asymptomatic female adolescent populations but that urine samples may be a useful alternative to cervical samples to monitor changes in HPV prevalence in females in the post-HPV vaccination era. However, care should be taken when extrapolating HPV findings from urine samples to the cervix. In males, urine samples do not seem to be optimal for monitoring HPV prevalence due to a low human genomic DNA content and HPV DNA detection rate compared to other urogenital sites. In each situation the costs and benefits of HPV DNA detection in urine compared to alternative monitoring options should be carefully considered.

Keywords: cervical cancer, HPV, surveillance, vaccination, virology, cervix

Corrigendum for this paper has been published

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