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Modeling pegylated liposomal doxorubicin-induced hand-foot syndrome and intestinal mucositis in zebrafish

Authors Chen Y, Lee Y, Wen C, Chen Y, Chen Y

Received 9 March 2014

Accepted for publication 24 April 2014

Published 1 July 2014 Volume 2014:7 Pages 1169—1175

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OTT.S63785

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3


Yau-Hung Chen,1 Ya-Ting Lee,1 Chi-Chung Wen,2 Yun-Chen Chen,3 Yu-Jen Chen4,5

1Department of Chemistry, 2Department of Mathematics, 3Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tamkang University, New Taipei City, Taiwan; 4Graduate Institute of Pharmacology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Department of Radiation Oncology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan

Abstract: Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) has been widely used to treat cancer. The adverse effects of PLD noted in clinical practice, especially hand-foot syndrome (HFS), are regarded as unique, and the management methods for them remain limited. This study was aimed at developing a feasible experimental model for translational medicine to solve this clinical issue by using skin fluorescent transgenic zebrafish. We established an optimal protocol for the administration of Lipo-Dox™, a PLD in current clinical use, to the Tg(k18:dsred) zebrafish line expressing red fluorescence in keratinocytes. We made use of bodyweight, survival rate, gross observation, flssuorescent microscopic assessment, and pathological examination of the zebrafish to assess this model. The consecutive administration protocol of PLD resulted in growth retardation of the zebrafish embryo and survival impairment, indicating establishment of a significant toxicity. We observed fin necrosis and keratinocyte dissociation phenotypes in the PLD-treated fish after consecutive administration. The skin toxicity induced by the Lipo-Dox injection was subsequently reversible, which might be compatible with a clinical course of skin recovery after discontinuation of Lipo-Dox administration. Furthermore, we found that the number of intestinal goblet cells, an important marker of intestinal inflammation, in the Lipo-Dox-injected zebrafish was markedly increased, accompanied by impaired mucosal integrity. The intestinal inflammation induced by Lipo-Dox resembled the intestinal mucositis the clinical patients suffered from after the administration of PLD. In conclusion, we established a zebrafish model for PLD-induced HFS. The intestinal mucositis simultaneously noted in the PLD-treated zebrafish validated the similarity of clinical courses after administration of PLD. This model is easily assessable, efficient, and worthy for use in developing a new therapeutic protocol for prevention or treatment of HFS as well as intestinal mucositis. Further clinical investigations to validate the correlation between human and zebrafish data are warranted.

Keywords: doxorubicin, keratin, liposome, mucositis, skin, zebrafish

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