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Medical Student Perceptions of Emergency Medical Technician Training During the First Year of Medical School

Authors Wright WS, Blackwell TH, Gonzalez Jackson C, Perez A

Received 21 September 2019

Accepted for publication 11 January 2020

Published 30 January 2020 Volume 2020:11 Pages 99—106

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S231946

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Anwarul Azim Majumder


William S Wright,1 Thomas H Blackwell,2 Chloe Gonzalez Jackson,3 Alexander Perez3

1Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville, Greenville, SC, USA; 2University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville, Emergency Medicine, Prisma Health–Upstate, Formerly Greenville Health System, Greenville, SC, USA; 3University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville, Greenville, SC, USA

Correspondence: William S Wright
Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville, 701 Grove Road, Greenville, SC 29605, USA
Tel +1 864-455-9865
Fax +1 864-455-8404
Email wrigh288@greenvillemed.sc.edu

Purpose: Medical schools look for ways to provide clinical experiences and skill development in connection with knowledge. One method used is to provide emergency medical technician (EMT) training to medical students; however, limited data are available concerning EMT training in medical education. Therefore, the aim of this study was to review student feedback about the EMT curriculum through multiple iterations of the curriculum.
Methods: Students completed a voluntary school administered survey upon completion of their first year of medical school. Student responses to statements related to the EMT course and program were analyzed for classes matriculating in academic years 2012– 2017. A one-way ANOVA with post hoc Tukey Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) was performed across all years for each survey statement.
Results: Mean response scores to statements related to the EMT course were higher when the EMT course was a standalone course and lower when integrated with biomedical science coursework. Students “strongly agreed” or “agreed” with most statements related to experiences and clinical skill development provided by the EMT program. Response rates ranged between 46– 52 (88– 100%) for 2012, 40– 46 (74– 85%) for 2013, 72– 79 (88– 96%) for 2014, 73– 86 (71– 83%) for 2015, 47– 65 (46– 63%) for 2016, 62– 82 (59– 78%) for 2017.
Conclusion: Our data show that first year medical students liked the course design best when the EMT course was a standalone course at the start of the M.D. program while students liked experiences and clinical skill development provided by the EMT program regardless of course design.

Keywords: emergency medical technician, medical curriculum, student perspectives, curriculum design

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