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Management of corneal bee sting

Authors Razmjoo, Abtahi, Roomizadeh P, Mohammadi, Abtahi S

Published 2 December 2011 Volume 2011:5 Pages 1697—1700

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S26919

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3


Video abstract presented by H Abtahi and P Roomizadeh

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Hassan Razmjoo1,2, Mohammad-Ali Abtahi1,2,4, Peyman Roomizadeh1,3, Zahra Mohammadi1,2, Seyed-Hossein Abtahi1,3,4
1Medical School, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS); 2Ophthalmology Ward, Feiz Hospital, IUMS; 3Isfahan Medical Students Research Center (IMSRC), IUMS; 4Isfahan Ophthalmology Research Center (IORC), Feiz Hospital, IUMS, Isfahan, Iran

Abstract: Corneal bee sting is an uncommon environmental eye injury that can result in various ocular complications with an etiology of penetrating, immunologic, and toxic effects of the stinger and its injected venom. In this study we present our experience in the management of a middle-aged male with a right-sided deep corneal bee sting. On arrival, the patient was complaining of severe pain, blurry vision with acuity of 160/200, and tearing, which he had experienced soon after the injury. Firstly, we administered conventional drugs for eye injuries, including topical antibiotic, corticosteroid, and cycloplegic agents. After 2 days, corneal stromal infiltration and edema developed around the site of the sting, and visual acuity decreased to 100/200. These conditions led us to remove the stinger surgically. Within 25 days of follow-up, the corneal infiltration decreased gradually, and visual acuity improved to 180/200. We suggest a two-stage management approach for cases of corneal sting. For the first stage, if the stinger is readily accessible or primary dramatic reactions, including infiltration, especially on the visual axis, exist, manual or surgical removal would be indicated. Otherwise, we recommend conventional treatments for eye injuries. Given this situation, patients should be closely monitored for detection of any worsening. If the condition does not resolve or even deteriorates, for the second stage, surgical removal of the stinger under local or generalized anesthesia is indicated.

Keywords: bee sting, stinger, cornea, removal, management, surgery

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