Back to Journals » Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy » Volume 7

Management of adult diabetic ketoacidosis

Authors Gosmanov AR, Gosmanova E, Dillard-Cannon E

Received 18 April 2014

Accepted for publication 13 May 2014

Published 30 June 2014 Volume 2014:7 Pages 255—264

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/DMSO.S50516

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2


Aidar R Gosmanov,1 Elvira O Gosmanova,2 Erika Dillard-Cannon3

1Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, 2Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, 3Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Biochemistry, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, USA


Abstract: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a rare yet potentially fatal hyperglycemic crisis that can occur in patients with both type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus. Due to its increasing incidence and economic impact related to the treatment and associated morbidity, effective management and prevention is key. Elements of management include making the appropriate diagnosis using current laboratory tools and clinical criteria and coordinating fluid resuscitation, insulin therapy, and electrolyte replacement through feedback obtained from timely patient monitoring and knowledge of resolution criteria. In addition, awareness of special populations such as patients with renal disease presenting with DKA is important. During the DKA therapy, complications may arise and appropriate strategies to prevent these complications are required. DKA prevention strategies including patient and provider education are important. This review aims to provide a brief overview of DKA from its pathophysiology to clinical presentation with in depth focus on up-to-date therapeutic management.

Keywords: DKA treatment, insulin, prevention, ESKD


Letter about this article has been published

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]  View Full Text [HTML][Machine readable]