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Magnetic thermoablation stimuli alter BCL2 and FGF-R1 but not HSP70 expression profiles in BT474 breast tumors

Authors Stapf M, Pömpner N, Kettering M, Hilger I

Received 12 November 2014

Accepted for publication 20 December 2014

Published 10 March 2015 Volume 2015:10(1) Pages 1931—1939

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IJN.S77372

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Prof. Dr. Thomas J Webster


Marcus Stapf, Nadine Pömpner, Melanie Kettering, Ingrid Hilger

Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Jena University Hospital, Jena, Germany

Abstract: Magnetically induced heating of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) in an alternating magnetic field (AMF) is a promising minimal invasive tool for localized tumor treatment that eradicates tumor cells by applying thermal stress. While temperatures between 42°C and 45°C induce apoptosis and sensitize the cells for chemo- and radiation therapies when applied for at least 30 minutes, temperatures above 50°C, so-called thermoablative temperatures, rapidly induce irreversible cell damage resulting in necrosis. Since only little is known concerning the protein expression of anti-apoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2), fibroblast growth factor receptor 1
(FGF-R1), and heat shock protein (HSP70) after short-time magnetic thermoablative tumor treatment, these relevant tumor proteins were investigated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in a human BT474 breast cancer mouse xenograft model. In the investigated sample groups, the application of thermoablative temperatures (<2 minutes) led to a downregulation of BCL2 and FGF-R1 on the protein level while the level of HSP70 remained unchanged. Coincidently, the tumor tissue was damaged by heat, resulting in large apoptotic and necrotic areas in regions with high MNP concentration. Taken together, thermoablative heating induced via magnetic methods can reduce the expression of tumor-related proteins and locally inactivate tumor tissue, leading to a prospectively reduced tumorigenicity of cancerous tissues. The presented data allow a deeper insight into the molecular mechanisms in relation to magnetic thermoablative tumor treatments with the aim of further improvements.

Keywords: magnetic nanoparticles (MNP), thermoablation, in vivo, mouse model, breast cancer tumor

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