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Machine perfusion for improving outcomes following renal transplant: current perspectives

Authors Cannon R, Franklin G

Received 7 July 2015

Accepted for publication 30 October 2015

Published 29 March 2016 Volume 2016:8 Pages 1—7

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/TRRM.S64486

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Rabi Yacoub

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Professor Qing Yi


Robert M Cannon,1 Glen A Franklin1,2

1The Hiram C Polk Jr MD Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, 2Kentucky Organ Donor Affiliates, Louisville, KY, USA

Abstract: There is a disparity between the number of kidneys available for transplantation and the number of patients awaiting an organ while on dialysis. The current kidney waiting list in the US contains more than 100,000 patients. This need has led to the inclusion of older donors with worsening renal function, as well as greater utilization of kidneys from non-heartbeating (donation after cardiac death) donors. Coinciding with this trend has been a growing interest in technology to improve the function of these more marginal organs, the most important of which currently is machine perfusion (MP) of donated kidneys after procurement. While this technology has no standard guidelines currently for comprehensive use, there are many studies that demonstrate higher organ yield and function after a period of MP. Particularly with the older donor and during donation after cardiac death cases, MP may offer some significant benefits. This manuscript reviews all of the current literature regarding MP and its role in renal transplantation. We will discuss both the experience in Europe and the US using machine perfusion for donated kidneys.

Keywords: machine perfusion, renal transplantation, kidney pumping, renal failure, organ donation

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