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Lobomycosis: epidemiology, clinical presentation, and management options

Authors Francesconi V, Klein AP, Santos AP, Ramasawmy R, Francesconi F

Received 1 February 2014

Accepted for publication 5 April 2014

Published 9 October 2014 Volume 2014:10 Pages 851—860


Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3

Valeska Albuquerque Francesconi,1 Ana Paula Klein,2 Ana Paula Botelho Gualda Santos,2 Rajendranath Ramasawmy,3 Fábio Francesconi4

1Department of Dermatology, Tropical Medicine Foundation Heitor Vieira Dourado, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil; 2Amazon Federal University, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil; 3Department of Immunogenetics, 4Department of Dermatology, Tropical Medicine Foundation Heitor Vieira Dourado, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil

Abstract: Lobomycosis is a subcutaneous mycosis of chronic evolution caused by the Lacazia loboi fungus. Its distribution is almost exclusive in the Americas, and it has a particularly high prevalence in the Amazon basin. Cases of lobomycosis have been reported only in dolphins and humans. Its prevalence is higher among men who are active in the forest, such as rubber tappers, bushmen, miners, and Indian men. It is recognized that the traumatic implantation of the fungus on the skin is the route by which humans acquire this infection. The lesions affect mainly exposed areas such as the auricles and upper and lower limbs and are typically presented as keloid-like lesions. Currently, surgical removal is the therapeutic procedure of choice in initial cases. Despite the existing data and studies to date, the active immune mechanisms in this infection and its involvement in the control or development of lacaziosis have not been fully clarified. In recent years, little progress has been made in the appraisal of the epidemiologic aspects of the disease. So far, we have neither a population-based study nor any evaluation directed to the forest workers.

Keywords: infection, Lacazia loboi, lobomycosis, lacaziosis, mycosis

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