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Link between vitamin D and airway remodeling

Authors Berraies A, Hamzaoui K, Hamzaoui A

Received 16 December 2013

Accepted for publication 8 February 2014

Published 1 April 2014 Volume 2014:7 Pages 23—30

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/JAA.S46944

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 4


Anissa Berraies, Kamel Hamzaoui, Agnes Hamzaoui

Pediatric Respiratory Diseases Department, Abderrahmen Mami Hospital, Ariana, and Research Unit 12SP15 Tunis El Manar University, Tunis, Tunisia

Abstract: In the last decade, many epidemiologic studies have investigated the link between vitamin D deficiency and asthma. Most studies have shown that vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of asthma and allergies. Low levels of vitamin D have been associated with asthma severity and loss of control, together with recurrent exacerbations. Remodeling is an early event in asthma described as a consequence of production of mediators and growth factors by inflammatory and resident bronchial cells. Consequently, lung function is altered, with a decrease in forced expiratory volume in one second and exacerbated airway hyperresponsiveness. Subepithelial fibrosis and airway smooth muscle cell hypertrophy are typical features of structural changes in the airways. In animal models, vitamin D deficiency enhances inflammation and bronchial anomalies. In severe asthma of childhood, major remodeling is observed in patients with low vitamin D levels. Conversely, the antifibrotic and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D in smooth muscle cells have been described in several experiments. In this review, we briefly summarize the current knowledge regarding the relationship between vitamin D and asthma, and focus on its effect on airway remodeling and its potential therapeutic impact for asthma.

Keywords: vitamin D, asthma, airway remodeling, airway smooth muscle, supplementation

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