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Proposed learning strategies of medical students in a clinical rotation in obstetrics and gynecology: a descriptive study

Authors Prasad A, Mughal A, Ahmed I, Ebrahim F, Ali Ahmad SM

Received 23 August 2016

Accepted for publication 1 September 2016

Published 14 November 2016 Volume 2016:7 Pages 641—642

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S120438

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Editor who approved publication: Dr Anwarul Azim Majumder


Alok Prasad, Aamer Mughal, Imran Ahmed, Farheen Ebrahim, Syed Mustafa Ali Ahmad

Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College – London, London, UK

We note with great interest the article by Deane and Murphy1 exploring the learning drivers and strategies of medical students in a clinical rotation in obstetrics and gynecology. The article highlights key points about the motivation of medical students, and we strongly agree that extrinsic motivators, such as obtaining a good ranking to stand a better chance when applying for future jobs, are key learning drivers. We lament the relative unimportance of intrinsic motivators and we commend the authors’ suggestion of considering strategies to foster more intrinsic drivers of student learning. We believe, however, that this will be difficult to implement with the intense competition prevalent at every stage of a medical career, with students’ motivations more likely to be of the extrinsic nature. Furthermore, from a practical standpoint, aspirations relating to future careers are often volatile or, more commonly, uncertain. This creates an environment wherein intrinsic motivators may not be applicable, and so we would argue that medical educators should focus more on aiding students to find their given area of interest, allowing the intrinsic motivation to develop naturally.

View the orignal paper by Deane and Murphy.



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