Back to Journals » Risk Management and Healthcare Policy » Volume 12

Knowledge, attitude and practice towards dengue fever prevention and associated factors among public health sector health-care professionals: in Dire Dawa, eastern Ethiopia

Authors Mohammed Yusuf A, Abdurashid Ibrahim N

Received 28 November 2018

Accepted for publication 27 March 2019

Published 7 June 2019 Volume 2019:12 Pages 91—104

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/RMHP.S195214

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Colin Mak

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Dr Kent Rondeau


Amir Mohammed Yusuf,1 Neil Abdurashid Ibrahim2

1Department of Public Health, Harar Health Science College, Harar, Ethiopia; 2Department of Midwifery, College of Medicine and Health Science, Dire Dawa University, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia

Background: The Ethiopian national strategy for the prevention, control and elimination of malaria is one of the Health Development Programs (HDP IV). Dengue fever is one of the vector borne diseases that causes Acute Febrile Illness and death in tropical and sub-tropical countries. Knowledge, attitude and practice of health-care professionals towards dengue fever prevention and associated factors among health professionals is not yet well known across the country and concern is varied in context and place. Therefore, the aim of this research was to assess knowledge, attitude and practice towards dengue fever prevention and associated factors among public health sector health-care professionals in Dire Dawa administrative city, eastern Ethiopia.
Materials and methods: An Institution-based cross sectional study was conducted from September 9 to October 13, 2017. The study was conducted among a sample of 348 health-care professionals which were from the randomly selected nine clusters of public health facilities located in urban and rural areas of Dire Dawa. Data were collected by self-administered structured questionnaire. Bivariate and multinomial logistic regression analyses were made to check the associations among predictor variables and to control for confounding factors. A P-value <0.05 was used to declare statistical significance.
Results: Of the 348 sampled health-care professionals, 300 were included in the analysis giving a response rate of 86.2%. Nearly half (148/49.3%) of the participants demonstrated a moderate level of knowledge, 140 (46.7%) a neutral level of attitude and 156 (52%) a low level of practice towards dengue fever prevention. Multinomial logistic regression revealed that type of health profession, type of health facility and dengue fever prevention training status were significantly associated with the knowledge, attitude and practice of health-care professionals. The odds of physicians and public-health officers having a high level of knowledge or a low knowledge level were (AOR [95% CI] =38.793 [7.279, 206.734]) and (AOR[95% CI] =6.15[1.643, 23.026]) times higher than the odds for nurse professionals. The odds for professionals who worked in health centers and had a high knowledge level towards dengue fever prevention were (AOR [95% CI] =0.252 [0.086, 0.737]) times higher than those working in referral hospitals. The odds of health-care professionals who were public-health officers and those who worked in primary hospitals having a favorable attitude towards dengue fever prevention were (AOR [95% CI] =7.011 [1.867, 26.321]) and (AOR [95% CI] =3.683 [1.284, 10.563]) times higher than the odds for nurse professionals and those who worked in a referral hospital setting respectively. The odds of health-care professionals who took dengue fever prevention training were 10.23 times (AOR [95% CI] =10.23 [1.052, 99.478]) higher than the odds for health-care professionals who had not received the training.
Conclusion: Knowledge attitude and practice of health-care professionals were not satisfactory towards dengue fever. Additional training is required to plug this gap. Thus, the regional health bureau and stakeholders should follow up and provide support including provision of the World Health Organization’s standardized guidelines of dengue fever prevention. We recommend similar studies to be done specifically in Ethiopia and elsewhere to better understand the gaps.

Keywords: dengue fever, knowledge, attitude, practice, health care professionals

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]  View Full Text [HTML][Machine readable]