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Kinin B1 and B2 receptor deficiency protects against obesity induced by a high-fat diet and improves glucose tolerance in mice

Authors Morais R, Silva E, Sales V, Silva R, Mori M, Bader M, Pesquero JB

Received 30 April 2015

Accepted for publication 16 July 2015

Published 26 August 2015 Volume 2015:8 Pages 399—407

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/DMSO.S87635

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 5

Editor who approved publication: Professor Ming-Hui Zou


Rafael L Morais,1 Elton D Silva,1 Vicência M Sales,1 Rafael Filippelli-Silva,1 Marcelo A Mori,1 Michael Bader,2 João B Pesquero1

1Department of Biophysics, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Max-Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany

Abstract: The kallikrein-kinin system is well known for its role in pain and inflammation, and has been shown recently by our group to have a role also in the regulation of energy expenditure. We have demonstrated that B1 receptor knockout (B1KO) mice are resistant to obesity induced by a high-fat diet (HFD) and that B1 receptor expression in adipocytes regulates glucose tolerance and predisposition to obesity. However, it is also known that in the absence of B1 receptor, the B2 receptor is overexpressed and can take over the function of its B1 counterpart, rendering uncertain the role of each kinin receptor in these metabolic effects. Therefore, we investigated the impact of ablation of each kinin receptor on energy metabolism using double kinin receptor knockout (B1B2KO) mice. Our data show that B1B2KO mice were resistant to HFD-induced obesity, with lower food intake and feed efficiency when compared with wild-type mice. They also had lower blood insulin and leptin levels and higher glucose tolerance after treatment with an HFD. Gene expression for tumor necrosis factor-alpha and C-reactive protein, which are important genes for insulin resistance, was reduced in white adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and the liver in B1B2KO mice after the HFD. In summary, our data show that disruption of kinin B1 and B2 receptors has a profound impact on metabolic homeostasis in mice, by improving glucose tolerance and preventing HFD-induced obesity. These novel findings could pave the way for development of new pharmacological strategies to treat metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance and obesity.

Keywords: kallikrein-kinin system, B1/B2 receptors, obesity, glucose tolerance, insulin resistance

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