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Insulin autoimmune syndrome as a cause of recurrent hypoglycemia in a carbimazole user: a case report from Nepal

Authors Pant V, Bhandari B, Baral S, Bajracharya SR

Received 15 October 2018

Accepted for publication 18 January 2019

Published 7 February 2019 Volume 2019:12 Pages 29—32

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IMCRJ.S190908

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Cristina Weinberg

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Professor Ronald Prineas


Vivek Pant,1 Bijay Bhandari,2 Suman Baral,3 Sangha Ratna Bajracharya4

1Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Institute of Medicine (IOM), Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital (TUTH), Kathmandu, Nepal; 2Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Medicine (IOM), Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital (TUTH), Kathmandu, Nepal; 3Endocrine Unit, Department of Medicine, Institute of Medicine (IOM), Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital (TUTH), Kathmandu, Nepal; 4Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Medicine (IOM), Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital (TUTH), Kathmandu, Nepal

Abstract: Insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS) is a rare cause of nondiabetic hypoglycemia characterized by hyperinsulinemia and autoantibodies to endogenous insulin without prior exposure to exogenous insulin. We report a drug-induced case of IAS in a 59-year-old Nepalese female. She had been taking carbimazole for Graves’ disease and later presented with recurrent episodes of hypoglycemia, with laboratory findings of low blood glucose, increased molar ratio of insulin to C-peptide, and elevated autoantibodies to insulin. IAS should be considered while evaluating hypoglycemia to prevent unwarranted invasive procedures and surgical interventions.

Keywords: insulin autoimmune syndrome, hypoglycemia, carbimazole, Hirata disease

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