Back to Journals » International Journal of Nanomedicine » Volume 9 » Issue 1

Influence of polyethylene glycol coating on biodistribution and toxicity of nanoscale graphene oxide in mice after intravenous injection

Authors Li B, Zhang XY, Yang JZ, Zhang YJ, Li WX, Fan CH, Huang Q

Received 21 April 2014

Accepted for publication 4 July 2014

Published 8 October 2014 Volume 2014:9(1) Pages 4697—4707

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IJN.S66591

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3

Bo Li,1,2 Xiao-Yong Zhang,1 Jian-Zhong Yang,1 Yu-Jie Zhang,1 Wen-Xin Li,1 Chun-Hai Fan,1 Qing Huang1

1Laboratory of Physical Biology, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 2Department of Human Anatomy, College of Basic Medical Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, People’s Republic of China

Abstract: In this study, we assessed the in vivo behavior and toxicology of nanoscale graphene oxide (NGO) in mice after intravenous injection. The influence of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating on the distribution and toxicity of the NGO was also investigated. The results show that NGO is mainly retained in the liver, lung, and spleen. Retention in the lung is partially due to NGO aggregation. The PEG coating reduces the retention of NGO in the liver, lung, and spleen and promotes the clearance of NGO from these organs, but NGO and NGO-PEG are still present after 3 months. The PEG coating effectively reduces the early weight loss caused by NGO and alleviates NGO-induced acute tissue injuries, which can include damage to the liver, lung, and kidney, and chronic hepatic and lung fibrosis.

Keywords: graphene oxide, biodistribution, toxicity, polyethylene glycol

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]  View Full Text [HTML][Machine readable]

 

Readers of this article also read:

Monitoring cancer stem cells: insights into clinical oncology

Lin SC, Xu YC, Gan ZH, Han K, Hu HY, Yao Y, Huang MZ, Min DL

OncoTargets and Therapy 2016, 9:731-740

Published Date: 11 February 2016

BRAF mutation as a biomarker in colorectal cancer

Varghese AM, Saltz LB

Advances in Genomics and Genetics 2015, 5:347-353

Published Date: 15 October 2015

Companion diagnostics and molecular imaging-enhanced approaches for oncology clinical trials

Van Heertum RL, Scarimbolo R, Ford R, Berdougo E, O’Neal M

Drug Design, Development and Therapy 2015, 9:5215-5223

Published Date: 11 September 2015

Tracking the 2015 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium: bridging cancer biology to clinical gastrointestinal oncology

Aprile G, Leone F, Giampieri R, Casagrande M, Marino D, Faloppi L, Cascinu S, Fasola G, Scartozzi M

OncoTargets and Therapy 2015, 8:1149-1156

Published Date: 22 May 2015

Brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer: a review

Banerjee R, Kamrava M

International Journal of Women's Health 2014, 6:555-564

Published Date: 28 May 2014

Palliative nursing care for children and adolescents with cancer

Foster TL, Bell CJ, McDonald CF, Harris JS, Gilmer MJ

Nursing: Research and Reviews 2012, 2:17-25

Published Date: 15 June 2012

Multidisciplinary care in pediatric oncology

Cantrell MA, Ruble K

Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare 2011, 4:171-181

Published Date: 30 May 2011

Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in the management of ovarian cancer

Gabriella Ferrandina, Giacomo Corrado, Angelo Licameli, et al

Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management 2010, 6:463-483

Published Date: 29 September 2010