Back to Journals » Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment » Volume 16

Incidence and Risk Factors of Depressive Symptoms in Chinese College Students

Authors Song Y, Liu Z, Chen H, Guo Q, Huang Y

Received 9 June 2020

Accepted for publication 12 September 2020

Published 23 October 2020 Volume 2020:16 Pages 2449—2457

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S264775

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Jun Chen


Yuqing Song,1– 3 Zhaorui Liu,1– 3 Hongguang Chen,1– 3 Qi Guo,4 Yueqin Huang1– 3

1Institute of Mental Health, Peking University Sixth Hospital, Beijing 100191, People’s Republic of China; 2Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Ministry of Health, Peking University, Beijing 100191, People’s Republic of China; 3National Clinical Research Center for Mental Disorders, Peking University Sixth Hospital, Beijing 100191, People’s Republic of China; 4School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100191, People’s Republic of China

Correspondence: Yuqing Song; Yueqin Huang Tel +86-010-82806164
Fax +86-010-62026310
Email songyuqingbj@yeah.net Huangyq@bjmu.edu.cn

Purpose: Previous surveys have shown an increase in the prevalence of depression among college students. However, knowledge on the incidence and risk factors of depressive symptoms in Chinese college students is limited. The aim of the present study was to determine the two-year cumulative incidence of depressive symptoms in Chinese college freshmen and identified related psychosocial risk factors.
Patients and Methods: A prospective survey was used to examine the cumulative incidence and risk factors of depressive symptoms (as assessed by the Centre for Epidemiological Study-Depression Scale, CES-D) among undergraduate freshmen. Five times (baseline, 5, 12, 17, and 24 months later) of self-reported data were collected from the students.
Results: Of the initial 758 non-depressed respondents at baseline, 235 developed depressive symptoms (CES-D ≥ 16) during the follow-up period. The two-year cumulative incidence was estimated to be 42% and not significantly different between males and females (χ 2=3.138, df =1, p=0.077). Logistic regression model showed that female gender (OR=0.43, 95% CI (0.28– 0.64)), high level of self-esteem (OR=0.67, 95% CI (0.52– 0.86)), and moderate exercise (OR=0.71, 95% CI (0.55– 0.92)) reduced the onset of depressive symptoms; while high levels of baseline anxiety (OR=1.48, 95% CI (1.12– 1.94)), Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Neuroticism (OR=1.40, 95% CI (1.09– 1.79)), concern over mistakes (OR=1.35,95% CI (1.07– 1.71)), daytime sleepiness (OR=1.28, 95% CI (1.02– 1.60)), mild exercise (OR=1.25, 95% CI (1.01– 1.55)) increased the new onset of depressive symptoms.
Conclusion: The high two-year cumulative incidence indicates that depressive symptoms are an important mental problem in Chinese college students. The present findings on the risk factors of depressive symptoms in Chinese college students may be useful for the design of student health screening and intervention programs.

Keywords: depression, anxiety, risk factor, incidence, college student

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]  View Full Text [HTML][Machine readable]