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Improvement Of Congenital Chloride Diarrhea With Corticosteroids: An Incidental Finding

Authors Valavi E, Javaherizadeh H, Hakimzadeh M, Amoori P

Received 25 June 2019

Accepted for publication 8 November 2019

Published 5 December 2019 Volume 2019:10 Pages 153—156

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/PHMT.S220725

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Professor Roosy Aulakh


Ehsan Valavi,1 Hazhir Javaherizadeh,2 Mehran Hakimzadeh,3 Parisa Amoori1

1Department of Pediatric Nephrology, Abuzar Children’s Hospital, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran; 2Alimentary Tract Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran; 3Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Abuzar Children’s Hospital, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran

Correspondence: Hazhir Javaherizadeh
Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Abuzar Children’s Hospital, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran
Tel +98-61-34443051-5
Email Hazhirja@yahoo.com

Abstract: Congenital chloride diarrhea of infancy is a life threatening disease. We discuss two boys with congenital chloride diarrhea over a long time period before and after kidney transplantation. In the first case, prenatal sonography revealed polyhydramnios and generalized bowel loop distention. The genetic study confirmed congenital chloride diarrhea of infancy. Multiple episodes of severe dehydration, hyponatremia and acute tubular necrosis were seen during the follow up period. He underwent a year of hemodialysis before kidney transplantation. Three periods of improvement concerning diarrhea occurred with the use of corticosteroids, taken for other reasons. These improvements were seen after prednisolone administration for mastoiditis and following prednisolone administration for kidney transplantation. The second case was a 3.5 year old boy who is the cousin of the first case. He was referred to hospital with chronic watery diarrhea, metabolic alkalosis, hypokalemia, hyponatremia and failure to thrive in the first year of life. He was also treated with prednisolone and showed significant improvement.

Keywords: bowel, congenital chloride diarrhea, corticosteroid therapy, hyponatremia, kidney

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