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Idiopathic intracranial hypertension in pediatric patients

Authors Jirásková N, Rozsíval P

Published 5 December 2008 Volume 2008:2(4) Pages 723—726

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S1593


Naďa Jirásková, Pavel Rozsíval

Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic

Purpose: To evaluate retrospectively the features, treatment, and outcome of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) in children.

Methods: Nine patients, 15 years and younger, diagnosed with IIH. Inclusion criteria were papilledema, normal brain computer tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid pressure greater than 250 mm H2O, normal cerebrospinal fluid content, and a nonfocal neurologic examination except for sixth nerve palsy.

Results: Of the nine patients, eight were girls. Five girls were overweight and one boy was obese. The most common presenting symptom was headache (5 patients). Diplopia or strabismus did not occur in our group. Visual field abnormalities were present in all eyes, and severe visual loss resulting in light perception vision occurred in both eyes of one patient. Eight patients were treated medically with acetazolamide alone, and one girl needed a combination of acetazolamide and corticosteroids. This girl also required optic nerve sheath decompression surgery. Resolution of papilledema and recovery of visual function occurred in all patients.

Conclusions: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension in prepubertal children is rather uncommon. Prompt diagnosis and management are important to prevent permanent visual loss.

Keywords: idiopathic intracranial hypertension, pediatric, treatment

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