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Household Level Drug Utilization and Associated Factors in South Gondar Zone, North Western Ethiopia

Authors Ewunetei A, Yisak H, Kefale B

Received 17 December 2020

Accepted for publication 2 February 2021

Published 16 February 2021 Volume 2021:13 Pages 47—58

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/DHPS.S297354

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Hemalkumar B Mehta


Amien Ewunetei,1 Hiwot Yisak,2 Belayneh Kefale1

1Department of Pharmacy, College of Health Sciences, Debre Tabor University, Debre Tabor, Ethiopia; 2Department of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Debre Tabor University, Debre Tabor, Ethiopia

Correspondence: Amien Ewunetei
Department of Pharmacy, College of Health Sciences, Debre Tabor University, Debre Tabor, 272, Ethiopia
Tel +251913670582
Email amienpeace@gmail.com

Introduction: Inappropriate drug utilization may reduce the best possible benefits of drug therapy, and patients may not be cured, they may be exposed to toxicity, and medications may be wasted. The aim of this study is to assess household-level drug utilization practices and their associated factors.
Methods: A cross-sectional community-based study was conducted from January 15 to March 15, 2020. In total, 847 households selected by stratified multistage sampling were visited. Bivariate and multivariable analyses for association were carried out using a binary logistic regression model. The statistical significance of an association was confirmed at p< 0.05.
Results: Of the total 847 households, 378 (44.6%) were found to store drugs at home at the time of datacollection. In the 371 households that allowed observation of the drugs stored, a mean of 2.51 (SD=1.68) drugs per household was found; 40.2% of stored medicines were not in use at the time of the study. The prevalences of medication hoarding, sharing, and allopathic self-medication were 20.4%, 26.3%, and 43.8%, respectively. Higher monthly income and the presence of a child aged under 5 years were significantly associated with drug hoarding. The presence of an elderly person aged above 65 years and the presence of a family member with chronic illness were significantly associated with drug hoarding and sharing. Families with higher educational status were less likely to hoard and share medicines. The presence of stored drugs at home was significantly associated with the practice of self-medication.
Conclusion: A high prevalence of inappropriate drug utilization was observed. Factors such as the presence of a family member with chronic illness, elderly people, and children under 5, higher income, and the presence of stored drugs were significantly associated with inappropriate drug utilization. Families of higher educational status were less likely to hoard and share medicines.

Keywords: drug storage, medication hoarding, drug sharing, self-medication, Ethiopia

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