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Fesoterodine for the treatment of urinary incontinence and overactive bladder

Authors Pamela Ellsworth

Published 3 November 2009 Volume 2009:5 Pages 869—876

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/TCRM.S6483

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

Pamela Ellsworth

The Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University Providence, RI, USA

Abstract: Overactive bladder (OAB) is a highly prevalent condition, affecting males and females. The prevalence increases with age. Behavioral therapy and antimuscarinic therapy remain the first-line therapies for management of OAB. Despite improvements in symptoms, persistence with antimuscarinic therapy has remained low. Multiple factors including patient expectations, adverse effects and cost may affect persistence. Fesoterodine is one of the newest antimuscarinic agent approved for the management of OAB. It is unique in that it shares the same active metabolite as tolterodine, 5-hydoxymethyltolterodine (5-HMT); however, this conversion is established via ubiquitous esterases and not via the cytochrome P450 system, thus providing a faster and more efficient conversion to 5-HMT. Fesoterodine is available in 2 doses, 4 mg and 8 mg. Clinical trials have established a dose response relationship in efficacy parameters as well as improvements in quality of life. As with all antimuscarinics, dry mouth and constipation are the more common side effects. A combination of medical therapy and behavioral therapy improves the overall outcome in management of OAB. Dose flexibility may help improve efficacy outcomes and patient education on the management of common adverse effects may improve tolerability with these agents.

Keywords: overactive bladder, antimuscarinic agent, esterase, 5-HMT, fesoterodine

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