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Faculty intent to engage in interprofessional education

Authors Olenick M, Allen LR

Received 25 September 2012

Accepted for publication 18 February 2013

Published 19 April 2013 Volume 2013:6 Pages 149—161

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/JMDH.S38499

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 4

Maria Olenick,1 Lois Ryan Allen2

1College of Nursing and Health Science, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA; 2School of Nursing, Widener University, Chester, PA, USA

Background: This descriptive correlational and comparative study explored health-care faculty (HCF) attitudes toward interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional health-care teams, HCF perceptions of subjective norms, the influence of subjective norms on HCF intent to engage in IPE, and HCF intent to engage in IPE. In addition, differences among seven disciplines of HCF were explored.
Methods: Nursing, medicine, pharmacy, physical therapy, occupational therapy, physician assistants, and social work faculty were identified. Stratified random sampling was used to ensure that the population surveyed was representative of the target population. The total sample for this study included 439 HCF from the seven identified health-care professions in the US. Data collection included measures of attitudes toward IPE and attitudes toward interprofessional health-care teams. Subjective norms were measured using two 7-point rating scales. Intent to engage in IPE was measured using a 10-point rating scale.
Results: There were no significant differences among HCF groups regarding attitudes toward IPE or interprofessional health-care teams. Administrative faculty reported greater intent to engage in IPE than teaching faculty. HCF who were currently in or had previously engaged in IPE reported greater intent to engage in or continue to engage, and had higher attitude and subjective norm scores than faculty without IPE experience. The combination of perceived pressure from school administrators and attitudes toward IPE was the best predictor of intent to engage in IPE.
Conclusion: IPE has the potential to influence patient quality of care and lead to better working relationships between health-care providers. HCF are more likely to engage in IPE when they believe their school's administrators think they should engage in IPE and when they have positive attitudes toward IPE.

Keywords: interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary, IPE, teamwork, health-care

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