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Exercise electrocardiographic responses and serum cystatin C levels among metabolic syndrome patients without overt diabetes mellitus

Authors Tanindi A, Olgun, Tuncel AF, CELIK B, Pasaoglu H, Boyaci B

Published 6 February 2011 Volume 2011:7 Pages 59—65

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S16638

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2


Asli Tanindi1 Hilal Olgun1 Ayse Tuncel2 Bulent Celik3 Hatice Pasaoglu2 Bulent Boyaci1
1Department of Cardiology, 2Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, 3Department of Statistics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey

Objectives: An impaired heart rate response during exercise (chronotropic incompetence) and an impaired heart rate recovery (HRR) after exercise are predictors of cardiovascular risk and mortality. Cystatin C is a novel marker for cardiovascular disease. We aimed to investigate exercise electrocardiographic responses in patients with metabolic syndrome who were without overt diabetes mellitus, in addition to the association of serum cystatin C levels with the exercise electrocardiographic test results.
Method: Forty-three consecutive patients admitted to a cardiology outpatient clinic without angina pectoris were recruited if they met criteria for metabolic syndrome but did not have overt diabetes mellitus. Serum cystatin C levels were measured, and all participants underwent exercise electrocardiographic testing. Patients who were found to have ischemia had a coronary angiography procedure.
Results: The mean cystatin C level of patients was higher in metabolic syndrome group than healthy controls (610.1 ± 334.02 vs 337.3 ± 111.01 µg/L; P < 0.001). The percentage of patients with ischemia confirmed by coronary angiography was 13.9% in the metabolic syndrome group. Cystatin C levels in the ischemic patients of the metabolic syndrome group were higher than that in nonischemic patients (957.00 ± 375.6 vs 553.8 ± 295.3 µg /L; P = 0.005). Chronotropic incompetence was observed in 30.2% of the patients with metabolic syndrome compared with 16.7% in the control group (P = 0.186). Chronotropic response indices were 0.8 ± 0.18 versus 0.9 ± 0.10 for the two groups, respectively (P = 0.259). HRR was significantly lower in the metabolic syndrome patients compared with the controls (20.1 ± 8.01 vs 25.2 ± 4.5 per min; P , 0.001), and the ST-segment adjustment relative to heart rate(ST/HR index ratio) was 1.4 ± 1.34 versus 0.4 ± 0.31 µV/beat (P < 0.001), respectively. Cystatin C was negatively correlated with the chronotropic response index (CRI) and HRR and was positively correlated with ST/HR index in the entire study population (R = -0.658, -0.346, 0.388, respectively; P < 0.05).
Conclusions: A substantial proportion of metabolic syndrome patients without overt diabetes mellitus had silent coronary ischemia in addition to impairment of objective exercise electrocardiographic parameters. In the metabolic syndrome patients without overt diabetes mellitus, cystatin C levels were found to be elevated and the elevation was more pronounced in the subgroup with silent ischemia. Cystatin C was also correlated with HRR and CRI.

Keywords: exercise electrocardiography, metabolic syndrome, silent ischemia, cystatin C

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