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Evolving Treatment Patterns for Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients in the United States in April 2020–July 2020

Authors Fan X, Johnson BH, Johnston SS, Elangovanraaj N, Coplan P, Khanna R

Received 3 November 2020

Accepted for publication 30 December 2020

Published 25 January 2021 Volume 2021:14 Pages 267—271

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S290118

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 4

Editor who approved publication: Dr Scott Fraser


Xiaozhou Fan,1 Barbara H Johnson,1 Stephen S Johnston,1 Nivesh Elangovanraaj,2 Paul Coplan,1 Rahul Khanna1

1Medical Device Epidemiology and Real World Data Sciences, Johnson & Johnson, New Brunswick, NJ, USA; 2 Mu Sigma Inc, Bangalore, India

Correspondence: Xiaozhou Fan
Medical Device Epidemiology and Real World Data Sciences, Johnson & Johnson, 410 George St, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
Tel +1 908 208-2625
Fax +1 732 524-5242
Email xfan9@its.jnj.com

Abstract: We sought to examine the trend (April–July) in the treatment patterns among hospitalized COVID-19 patients using the Premier Healthcare Database (PHD). In the analysis, we identified 53,264 patients from 302 hospitalsthat continuously provided inpatient data from April 1, 2020 to July 31, 2020 to the PHD, a nationwide, population-based multihospital research database in the US. We used generalized estimating equations (GEE) models to assess changes in the proportion of therapies used during the study period. After adjusting for patient and provider factors, a decline in hydroxychloroquine and an increase in azithromycin and dexamethasone were observed among COVID-19 patients during the 4-month study period.

Keywords: COVID-19, hospitalization, treatment pattern

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