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Emerging optical nanoscopy techniques

Authors Montgomery PC, Leong-Hoi A

Received 7 February 2015

Accepted for publication 26 March 2015

Published 29 September 2015 Volume 2015:8 Pages 31—44

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/NSA.S50042

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 4

Editor who approved publication: Professor Israel (Rudi) Rubinstein


Video abstract presented by Paul C Montgomery.

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Paul C Montgomery, Audrey Leong-Hoi

Laboratoire des Sciences de l'Ingénieur, de l'Informatique et de l'Imagerie (ICube), Unistra-CNRS, Strasbourg, France

Abstract: To face the challenges of modern health care, new imaging techniques with subcellular resolution or detection over wide fields are required. Far field optical nanoscopy presents many new solutions, providing high resolution or detection at high speed. We present a new classification scheme to help appreciate the growing number of optical nanoscopy techniques. We underline an important distinction between superresolution techniques that provide improved resolving power and nanodetection techniques for characterizing unresolved nanostructures. Some of the emerging techniques within these two categories are highlighted with applications in biophysics and medicine. Recent techniques employing wider angle imaging by digital holography and scattering lens microscopy allow superresolution to be achieved for subcellular and even in vivo, imaging without labeling. Nanodetection techniques are divided into four subcategories using contrast, phase, deconvolution, and nanomarkers. Contrast enhancement is illustrated by means of a polarized light-based technique and with strobed phase-contrast microscopy to reveal nanostructures. Very high sensitivity phase measurement using interference microscopy is shown to provide nanometric surface roughness measurement or to reveal internal nanometric structures. Finally, the use of nanomarkers is illustrated with stochastic fluorescence microscopy for mapping intracellular structures. We also present some of the future perspectives of optical nanoscopy.

Keywords: microscopy, imaging, superresolution, nanodetection, biophysics, medical imaging

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