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Elucidating the in vivo fate of nanocrystals using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model: a case study with the anticancer agent SNX-2112

Authors Dong D, Wang X, Wang H, Zhang X, Wang Y, Wu B

Received 22 December 2014

Accepted for publication 16 February 2015

Published 31 March 2015 Volume 2015:10(1) Pages 2521—2535

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IJN.S79734

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Dr Lei Yang

Dong Dong,1* Xiao Wang,1* Huailing Wang,1 Xingwang Zhang,2 Yifei Wang,1 Baojian Wu2

1Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, 2Division of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China

*These authors contributed equally to this work

Introduction: SNX-2112 is a promising anticancer agent but has poor solubility in both water and oil. In the study reported here, we aimed to develop a nanocrystal formulation for SNX-2112 and to determine the pharmacokinetic behaviors of the prepared nanocrystals.
Methods: Nanocrystals of SNX-2112 were prepared using the wet-media milling technique and characterized by particle size, differential scanning calorimetry, drug release, etc. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was undertaken to evaluate the drug’s disposition in rats following administration of drug cosolvent or nanocrystals.
Results: The optimized SNX-2112 nanocrystals (with poloxamer 188 as the stabilizer) were 203 nm in size with a zeta potential of -11.6 mV. In addition, the nanocrystals showed a comparable release profile to the control (drug cosolvent). Further, the rat PBPK model incorporating the parameters of particulate uptake (into the liver and spleen) and of in vivo drug release was well fitted to the experimental data following administration of the drug nanocrystals. The results reveal that the nanocrystals rapidly released drug molecules in vivo, accounting for their cosolvent-like pharmacokinetic behaviors. Due to particulate uptake, drug accumulation in the liver and spleen was significant at the initial time points (within 1 hour).
Conclusion: The nanocrystals should be a good choice for the systemic delivery of the poorly soluble drug SNX-2112. Also, our study contributes to an improved understanding of the in vivo fate of nanocrystals.

Keywords: intravenous delivery, PBPK, tissue distribution, poloxamer 188

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