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Electroretinographic findings in transplant chorioretinopathy

Authors Chan-Kai B, Yeh S, Weleber R, Francis P, Adamus G, Witherspoon SR, Lauer A

Published 14 July 2010 Volume 2010:4 Pages 777—783

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S12057

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2


Brian T Chan-Kai1, Steven Yeh2, Richard G Weleber2, Peter J Francis2, Grazyna Adamus2, S Robert Witherspoon3, Andreas K Lauer1

1Cullen Eye Institute, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas; 2Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon; 3Retina Institute of Texas, Dallas, Texas, USA

Aim: Transplant chorioretinopathy is a rare complication following solid organ or bone ­marrow transplantation and can result in severe vision loss. This series presents electroretinogram (ERG) results in patients with this condition.

Methods: Patients who presented with bilateral vision loss following bone marrow or solid organ transplantation were identified. A complete ophthalmologic examination, fundus ­photography, and fluorescein angiography (FA) were performed. Full-field ERG was obtained in all patients and a multifocal ERG (mfERG) was obtained in two patients.

Results: Four patients were identified. All patients had bilateral vision loss and displayed a characteristic pattern of mottled hyperfluorescence on FA. Three patients developed ­progressive vision loss ranging from 20/60 to hand motions whereas one retained 20/40 vision. All patients exhibited moderate to severe cone dysfunction, while the degree of rod abnormalities was varied. Two patients with severe cone dysfunction showed mild clinical changes initially, but later developed progressive vision loss and chorioretinal atrophy.

Conclusion: Transplant chorioretinopathy patients undergoing ERG testing show cone ­dysfunction with a variable degree of rod dysfunction. ERG abnormalities preceded the visual acuity and clinical changes in two patients, suggesting that ERG may be a helpful predictor of the clinical course in this rare disease.

Keywords: transplant, chorioretinopathy, electroretinogram, ERG, mfERG

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