Back to Journals » International Journal of Nanomedicine » Volume 10 » Issue 1

Effects of PVA coated nanoparticles on human immune cells

Authors Strehl C, Gaber T, Maurizi L, Hahne M, Rauch R, Hoff P, Häupl T, Hofmann-Amtenbrink M, Poole AR, Hofmann H, Buttgereit F

Received 16 October 2014

Accepted for publication 13 December 2014

Published 8 May 2015 Volume 2015:10(1) Pages 3429—3445

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IJN.S75936

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 4

Editor who approved publication: Dr Thomas J Webster

Cindy Strehl,1,2 Timo Gaber,1–3 Lionel Maurizi,4 Martin Hahne,1,2 Roman Rauch,1,2 Paula Hoff,1–3 Thomas Häupl,1 Margarethe Hofmann-Amtenbrink,5 A Robin Poole,6 Heinrich Hofmann,4 Frank Buttgereit1–3

1Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; 2German Rheumatism Research Centre (DRFZ), Berlin, Germany; 3Berlin-Brandenburg Center for Regenerative Therapies (BCRT), Berlin, Germany; 4Powder Technology Laboratory, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland; 5MatSearch Consulting Hofmann, Pully-Lausanne, Switzerland; 6Department of Surgery, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada

Abstract: Nanotechnology provides new opportunities in human medicine, mainly for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The autoimmune disease rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is often diagnosed after irreversible joint structural damage has occurred. There is an urgent need for a very early diagnosis of RA, which can be achieved by more sensitive imaging methods. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) are already used in medicine and therefore represent a promising tool for early diagnosis of RA. The focus of our work was to investigate any potentially negative effects resulting from the interactions of newly developed amino-functionalized amino-polyvinyl alcohol coated (a-PVA) SPION (a-PVA-SPION), that are used for imaging, with human immune cells. We analyzed the influence of a-PVA-SPION with regard to cell survival and cell activation in human whole blood in general, and in human monocytes and macrophages representative of professional phagocytes, using flow cytometry, multiplex suspension array, and transmission electron microscopy. We found no effect of a-PVA-SPION on the viability of human immune cells, but cytokine secretion was affected. We further demonstrated that the percentage of viable macrophages increased on exposure to a-PVA-SPION. This effect was even stronger when a-PVA-SPION were added very early in the differentiation process. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that both monocytes and macrophages are able to endocytose a-PVA-SPION. Our findings demonstrate an interaction between human immune cells and a-PVA-SPION which needs to be taken into account when considering the use of a-PVA-SPION in human medicine.

Keywords: nanoparticle, cell viability, cytokine, monocyte, macrophage

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]  View Full Text [HTML][Machine readable]

 

Other article by this author:

Modification of the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles to enable their safe application in humans

Strehl C, Maurizi L, Gaber T, Hoff P, Broschard T, Poole AR, Hofmann H, Buttgereit F

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2016, 11:5883-5896

Published Date: 8 November 2016

Readers of this article also read:

Nanogel-crosslinked nanoparticles increase the inhibitory effects of W9 synthetic peptide on bone loss in a murine bone resorption model

Sato T, Alles N, Khan M, Nagano K, Takahashi M, Tamura Y, Shimoda A, Ohya K, Akiyoshi K, Aoki K

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2015, 10:3459-3473

Published Date: 11 May 2015

Novel stable cytokine delivery system in physiological pH solution: chitosan oligosaccharide/heparin nanoparticles

Wang B, Tan L, Deng D, Lu T, Zhou C, Li Z, Tang Z, Wu Z, Tang H

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2015, 10:3417-3427

Published Date: 8 May 2015

Reduction-responsive cross-linked stearyl peptide for effective delivery of plasmid DNA

Yao C, Tai Z, Wang X, Liu J, Zhu Q, Wu X, Zhang L, Zhang W, Tian J, Gao Y, Gao S

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2015, 10:3403-3416

Published Date: 8 May 2015

Effective small interfering RNA delivery in vitro via a new stearylated cationic peptide

Chen BL, Pan R, Askhatova D, Chen P

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2015, 10:3303-3314

Published Date: 2 May 2015

Green synthesis of water-soluble nontoxic polymeric nanocomposites containing silver nanoparticles

Prozorova GF, Pozdnyakov AS, Kuznetsova NP, Korzhova SA, Emel’yanov AI, Ermakova TG, Fadeeva TV, Sosedova LM

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2014, 9:1883-1889

Published Date: 16 April 2014

Methacrylic-based nanogels for the pH-sensitive delivery of 5-Fluorouracil in the colon

Ashwanikumar N, Kumar NA, Nair SA, Kumar GS

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2012, 7:5769-5779

Published Date: 15 November 2012

Cross-linked acrylic hydrogel for the controlled delivery of hydrophobic drugs in cancer therapy

Deepa G, Thulasidasan AK, Anto RJ, Pillai JJ, Kumar GS

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2012, 7:4077-4088

Published Date: 27 July 2012

Crystallization after intravitreal ganciclovir injection

Pitipol Choopong, Nattaporn Tesavibul, Nattawut Rodanant

Clinical Ophthalmology 2010, 4:709-711

Published Date: 14 July 2010