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Effect of levofloxacin on neutrophilic airway inflammation in stable COPD: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

Authors Siva R, Bafadhel M, Monteiro W, Brightling CE, Pavord ID

Received 4 October 2013

Accepted for publication 2 December 2013

Published 7 February 2014 Volume 2014:9(1) Pages 179—186

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S55419

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 4

Roshan Siva,1 Mona Bafadhel,2 William Monteiro,3 Christopher E Brightling,3 Ian D Pavord2

1Department of Respiratory Medicine, Croydon University Hospital, Croydon Health Services NHS Trust, London, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus, Oxford, 3Institute for Lung Health, NIHR Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit, Department of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK

Rationale: Airway inflammation persists after smoking cessation in established chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), suggesting that other factors drive the airway inflammatory response.
Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that high levels of bacterial colonization are associated with increased levels of neutrophilic airway inflammation in stable COPD by examining the cross-sectional relationship between these measurements and by conducting a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the effect of levofloxacin in patients with stable COPD.
Methods: Patients were randomized to receive either levofloxacin 500 mg daily or placebo for 7 days and underwent sputum induction for a differential cell count and quantitative bacterial analysis at baseline and at days 7, 14, and 28.
Results: Sputum percentage neutrophil count correlated with airway bacterial load at baseline (r=0.56; P=0.003). Levofloxacin reduced bacterial load compared with placebo by 4.9-fold (95% confidence interval, 1.4–25.7; P=0.02) at day 7 but had no effect at any point on any marker of neutrophilic airway inflammation. In patients with a baseline bacterial load of more than 106 cfu/mL, levofloxacin treatment was associated with a 26.5% (95% confidence interval, 1.8%–51.3%; P=0.04) greater reduction in the percentage neutrophil count compared with placebo at day 7. Change in percentage neutrophil count correlated significantly with baseline airway bacterial load and change in airway bacterial load.
Conclusion: In stable COPD, levofloxacin treatment causes a short-term reduction in bacterial load. This is associated with a reduction in neutrophilic airway inflammation in patients with high bacterial loads. Further studies are required to investigate whether this effect is clinically advantageous.

Keywords: bacteria, antibiotics, sputum



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