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Economic evaluation of first-line and maintenance treatments for advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a systematic review

Authors Chouaïd C, Crequit P, Borget I, Vergnenegre A

Received 24 July 2014

Accepted for publication 5 November 2014

Published 15 December 2014 Volume 2015:7 Pages 9—15

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CEOR.S43328

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Giorgio Colombo

Christos Chouaïd,1 Perinne Crequit,2 Isabelle Borget,3 Alain Vergnenegre4

1Service de Pneumologie et de Pathologie Professionnelle, Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal Créteil et Université de Paris Est Créteil, Paris, France; 2Service de Pneumologie, Hôpital Tenon, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France; 3Service de Biostatistique et d’Epidémiologie, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France; 4Unité d’Oncologie Thoracique et Cutanée, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Limoges, Limoges, France


Abstract: During these last years, there have been an increased number of new drugs for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), with a growing financial effect on patients and society. The purpose of this article was to review the economics of first-line and maintenance NSCLC treatments. We reviewed economic analyses of NSCLC therapies published between 2004 and 2014. In first-line settings, in unselected patients with advanced NSCLC, the cisplatin gemcitabine doublet appears to be cost-saving compared with other platinum doublets. In patients with nonsquamous NSCLC, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) per life-year gained (LYG) were $83,537, $178,613, and more than $300,000 for cisplatin-pemetrexed compared with, respectively, cisplatin-gemcitabine, cisplatin-carboplatin-paclitaxel, and carboplatin-paclitaxel-bevacizumab. For all primary chemotherapy agents, use of carboplatin is associated with slightly higher costs than cisplatin. In all the analysis, bevacizumab had an ICER greater than $150,000 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY). In epidermal growth factor receptor mutated advanced NSCLC, compared with carboplatin-paclitaxel doublet, targeted therapy based on testing available tissue yielded an ICER of $110,644 per QALY, and the rebiopsy strategy yielded an ICER of $122,219 per QALY. Compared with the triplet carboplatin-paclitaxel-bevacizumab, testing and rebiopsy strategies had ICERs of $25,547 and $44,036 per QALY, respectively. In an indirect comparison, ICERs per LYG and QALY of erlotinib versus gefitinib were $39,431 and $62,419, respectively. In anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive nonsquamous advanced NSCLC, the ICER of first-line crizotinib compared with that of chemotherapy was $255,970 per QALY. For maintenance therapy, gefitinib had an ICER of $19,214 per QALY, erlotinib had an ICER of $127,343 per LYG, and pemetrexed had an ICER varying between $183,589 and $205,597 per LYG. Most recent NSCLC strategies are based on apparently no cost-effective strategies if we consider an ICER below $50,000 per QALY an acceptable threshold. We need, probably on a countrywide level, to have a debate involving public health organizations and pharmaceutical companies, as well as clinicians and patients, to challenge the rising costs of managing lung cancer.

Keywords: lung cancer, costs, economics, cost-effectiveness, evaluation

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