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Diagnostic potential of methylated DAPK in brushing samples of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

Authors Zhang J, Shen Z, Liu H, Liu S, Shu W

Received 20 April 2018

Accepted for publication 29 May 2018

Published 28 August 2018 Volume 2018:10 Pages 2953—2964

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CMAR.S171796

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Cristina Weinberg

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Kenan Onel


Jian Zhang,1 Zhisen Shen,1 Huigao Liu,2 Shuai Liu,3 Wenxiu Shu4

1Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Ningbo Medical Center Lihuili Hospital, Ningbo, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Ningbo Zhenhai Longsai Hospital, Ningbo, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Radiology, Ningbo Medical Center Lihuili Eastern Hospital, Ningbo, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Oncology and Hematology, Ningbo Medical Center Lihuili Eastern Hospital, Ningbo, People’s Republic of China

Background: The death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) gene is an important member of the apoptotic pathway and is inactivated by abnormal methylation in numerous cancers, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, the diagnostic value of DAPK methylation in brushing samples and tissue samples of NPC remains unclear.
Methods: We conducted a systematic meta-analysis based on 17 studies (including 386 tissue cases, 233 brushing cases, and 296 blood cases).
Results: Our results revealed an association between methylated DAPK and increased risk of NPC in blood, brushing, and tissue samples. In addition, the comparison of the pooled sensitivity, specificity, and area under the curve of methylated DAPK in brushing and tissue samples demonstrated the non-inferior effectiveness of methylated DAPK in brushing samples to monitor the development of NPC.

Keywords: death-associated protein kinase, methylation, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, diagnosis

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