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Current perspectives on the spread of dengue in India

Authors Gupta E, Ballani N

Received 29 August 2014

Accepted for publication 29 September 2014

Published 11 December 2014 Volume 2014:7 Pages 337—342

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IDR.S55376

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Professor Suresh Antony

Ekta Gupta, Neha Ballani

Department of Clinical Virology, Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences, New Delhi, India

Abstract: Dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) are important arthropod-borne viral diseases. Each year, there are ~50 million dengue infections and ~500,000 individuals are hospitalized with DHF, mainly in Southeast Asia. Dengue in India has dramatically expanded over the last few decades, with rapidly changing epidemiology. The first major DHF outbreak in the entire nation occurred in 1996 by dengue virus serotype 2, and after a gap of almost a decade, the country faced yet another DF outbreak in the year 2003 by dengue virus serotype 3. A dramatic increase in the number and frequency of outbreaks followed, and, at present, in most of the states of India, dengue is almost endemic. At present, all the four serotypes are seen in circulation, but the predominant serotype keeps changing. Despite this trend, surveillance, reporting, and diagnosis of dengue remain largely passive in India. More active community-based epidemiological studies with intensive vector control and initiatives for dengue vaccine development should be geared up to control the spread of dengue in India. We review here the factors that may have contributed to the changing epidemiology of dengue in India.

Keywords: dengue, epidemiology, India, pathogenesis, vaccine

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