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Cryptococcal meningitis mimicking cerebral infarction: a case report

Authors Zhou WH, Lai JB, Huang TT, Xu Y, Hu SH

Received 28 July 2018

Accepted for publication 22 September 2018

Published 12 October 2018 Volume 2018:13 Pages 1999—2002

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S181774

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Cristina Weinberg

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Wu


Weihua Zhou,1–3,* Jianbo Lai,1–3,* Tingting Huang,1 Yi Xu,1–3 Shaohua Hu1–3

1Department of Psychiatry, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou 310003, China; 2The Key Laboratory of Mental Disorder’s Management in Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou 310003, China; 3Brain Research Institute of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003, China

*These authors contributed equally to this work

Abstract: Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is the most common type of fungal meningitis. The clinical symptoms of CM are nonspecific, and neuroimaging characteristics are variable. Herein, we present a case of a senile female with CM that was once misdiagnosed as cerebral infarction. Her condition worsened and she developed hydrocephalus. No apparent predisposing factors of CM were reported in this patient. The diagnosis of CM was definitely made after India ink staining of cerebrospinal fluid was positive. This case indicates that clinicians should bear cryptococcal infection in mind when the symptoms are nonspecific and neuroimaging findings are atypical.

Keywords: cryptococcal meningitis, cerebral infarction, neuroimaging

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