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COVID-19 and Obesity: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis and Treatment

Authors Zhu X, Yang L, Huang K

Received 4 October 2020

Accepted for publication 26 November 2020

Published 14 December 2020 Volume 2020:13 Pages 4953—4959

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/DMSO.S285197

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Dr Antonio Brunetti


Xinyu Zhu,1,2,* Liu Yang,1,2,* Kai Huang1,2

1Department of Cardiology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China; 2Clinical Center for Human Genomic Research, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China

*These authors contributed equally to this work

Correspondence: Kai Huang
Department of Cardiology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1277 Jiefang Ave, Wuhan, Hubei 430022, People’s Republic of China
Email [email protected]

Abstract: The growing prevalence of overweight and obesity has been a worldwide public health issue. During the COVID-19 pandemic, obesity is associated with a higher risk of severity and a worse clinical outcome of SARS-COV-2 infection. This may be because of the chronic low-grade inflammation, impaired immune response and metabolic disorders in obese patients. In this narrative review, we have summarized the association between obesity and COVID-19 and discussed the potential pathogenesis and treatment in these patients. This work may provide practical suggestions on the clinical management of obese COVID-19 patients.

Keywords: COVID-19, obesity, SARS-COV-2

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