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Correlation Between Ideal Cardiovascular Health Metrics and Plasma hs-CRP Levels in a North China Population: One Four-Year Follow-Up Study

Authors Chen J, Xu L, He Q, Wu S, Hu D, Lu K

Received 7 June 2020

Accepted for publication 7 August 2020

Published 17 September 2020 Volume 2020:13 Pages 617—625

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S266602

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Scott Fraser


Jia Chen,1 Liuyue Xu,2 Quan He,3 Shouling Wu,4 Dayi Hu,5 Kai Lu3

1Department of Clinical Nutrition, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Hematology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Cardiology, Kailuan General Hospital, Hebei United University, Tangshan 100816, People’s Republic of China; 5Heart Center, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing 100044, People’s Republic of China

Correspondence: Kai Lu
Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, No. 1, Yixueyuan Road, Chongqing 400016, People’s Republic of China
Tel/Fax +86 23 89011562
Email lukai2013@foxmail.com

Background: This prospective cohort study aimed to evaluate the potential association of ideal cardiovascular health metrics with the plasma levels of highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) among people in North China.
Methods: A total of 80,968 participants were included in this study at baseline. Data relating to seven health metrics and plasma hs-CRP levels were collected at baseline and the end of follow-up. The change in health metrics of each individual was compared and recorded. The potential association of gain or loss of each health metric, as well as the change in the total number of health metrics that each individual had during follow-up, with the risk of increased hs-CRP level, were explored by multiple Cox proportional hazards models.
Results: A total of 72,321 participants (94.51%) completed the follow-up, and the average follow-up time was 4.1 years. Ideal body mass index (BMI), physical activity, smoking status and total cholesterol all had significant impacts on hs-CRP levels, with ideal BMI having the largest impact. Losing ideal BMI during follow-up raised the probability of hs-CRP increase during the follow-up time by 1.72 (95% CI, 1.59– 1.86) times for men and 2.05 (95% CI, 1.76– 2.39) times for women. The effects of ideal salt intake and blood pressure on hs-CRP levels were uncertain. Changes in the total number of ideal metrics for each individual had a significant cumulative effect on hs-CRP. The hazard ratio of loss of four to six health metrics during follow-up on the risk of hs-CRP increase was 1.69 (95% CI, 1.38– 2.06) for men and 1.52 (95% CI, 1.13– 2.04) for women.
Conclusion: Loss or gain of ideal cardiovascular health metrics is associated with significant fluctuations in plasma hs-CRP levels. The cardiovascular benefits brought by the ideal health metrics are mediated at least in part by reducing systemic inflammation in the body.

Keywords: ideal cardiovascular health metrics, highly sensitive C-reactive protein, cardiovascular diseases

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