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Correlation Between Facial Skin Microbiota and Skin Barriers in a Chinese Female Population with Sensitive Skin

Authors Bai Y, Wang Y, Zheng H, Tan F, Yuan C

Received 20 October 2020

Accepted for publication 25 December 2020

Published 22 January 2021 Volume 2021:14 Pages 219—226

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IDR.S287844

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Prof. Dr. Héctor Mora-Montes


Yun Bai,1,* Yinjuan Wang,2,* Huajun Zheng,3 Fei Tan,1 Chao Yuan4

1Central Laboratory, The Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital of Tongji Medical University, Shanghai 200433, People’s Republic of China; 2Symrise (Shanghai) Co., Ltd, Shanghai 201206, People’s Republic of China; 3Shanghai-Ministry of Science and Technology Key Laboratory of Health and Disease Genomics, Chinese National Human Genome Center at Shanghai, Shanghai 201203, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Skin & Cosmetic Research, The Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital of Tongji Medical University, Shanghai 200433, People’s Republic of China

*These authors contributed equally to this work

Correspondence: Fei Tan
Central Laboratory, The Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital of Tongji Medical University, No. 1278 Baode Road, Shanghai 200433, People’s Republic of China
Email tanfeitrue@126.com
Chao Yuan
Department of Skin & Cosmetic Research, The Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital of Tongji Medical University, No. 1278 Baode Road, Shanghai 200433, People’s Republic of China
Email yuanchaocn@163.com

Background and Aim: The association of microbiota changes with sensitive skin remains controversial until now. Although a strong correlation is detected between skin microbiota distribution and biophysical parameters, there is little knowledge on the link between sensitive skin and skin microbiota in Chinese women. This study aimed to unravel the correlation between facial skin microbiota distribution and skin barriers in Chinese women with sensitive skin.
Materials and Methods: In total, 34 volunteers were enrolled, including 24 subjects with sensitive skin (SS group) and 10 subjects with non-sensitive skin (NS group). The cuticle moisture content, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and facial skin sebum secretion were measured, and the facial skin surface morphology was evaluated. Sensitive skin samples were collected from the facial (SS-F group) and chest skin of subjects in the SS group (SS-C group), while non-sensitive skin samples were collected from the facial skin of subjects in the NS group (NS-F group). All skin samples were subjected to 16S rRNA sequencing.
Results: 16S rRNA sequencing detected Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria as the three most common microbiota phyla and Propionibacterium, Paracoccus, and Corynebacterium as the three most common microbiota genera, and there were no significant differences in the relative frequency of Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, or Proteobacteria, or Propionibacterium, Paracoccus, or Corynebacterium among the SS-F, SS-C, and NS-F groups (P> 0.05). We detected no significant difference in the diversity of bacterial communities among the SS-F, SS-C, and NS-F groups; however, the Shannon’s diversity index was significantly higher in the NS-F group than in the SS-C group. In addition, Spearman correlation analysis showed a correlation between the microbiota genera and skin physiological parameters (P< 0.05).
Conclusion: This study preliminarily unravels the skin microbiota of sensitive skin using a high-throughput tool, and there are no microbiota genera with strong associations with skin physiological parameters.

Keywords: sensitive skin, skin microbiota, skin barrier, Chinese woman

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