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Copy number variation in sulfotransferase isoform 1A1 (SULT1A1) is significantly associated with enzymatic activity in Japanese subjects

Authors Yu X, Kubota T, Dhakal I, Hasegawa S, Williams S, Ozawa S, Kadlubar S

Received 1 August 2012

Accepted for publication 24 September 2012

Published 6 March 2013 Volume 2013:6 Pages 19—24

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/PGPM.S36579

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3

Xinfeng Yu,1 Takahiro Kubota,2 Ishwori Dhakal,1 Setsuo Hasegawa,3 Suzanne Williams,1 Shogo Ozawa,4 Susan Kadlubar1

1Division of Medical Genetics, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA; 2Chiba Institute of Science, Chiba, Japan; 3Sekino Clinical Pharmacology Clinic, Tokyo, Japan; 4Iwate Medical University, Iwate, Japan

Abstract: Sulfotransferase isoform 1A1 (SULT1A1) plays a key role in the metabolism of a variety of endo- and xenobiotics and it's activity could influence response to drugs. Our previous studies have focused on the impact of genetic variants of SULT1A1 on enzymatic activity in Caucasians and African-Americans. However, the contribution of genetic variants to SULT1A1 activity in Asians has not been explored. In this study, we investigated the collective effects of both SULT1A1 copy number variants (CNVs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter region, coding region, and 3´ untranslated region on SULT1A1 activity in Japanese subjects. SNPs in the SULT1A1 promoter and 3´ untranslated region were not associated with SULT1A1 activity (P > 0.05). SULT1A1*1/2 (Arg213His) was marginally associated with SULT1A1 activity (P = 0.037). However, SULT1A1 CNVs were strongly associated with SULT1A1 activity (trend test P = 0.008) and accounted for 10% of the observed variability in activity for Japanese subjects. In conclusion, SULT1A1 CNVs play a pivotal role in determination of SULT1A1 activity in Japanese subjects, highlighting the influence of ethnic differences in SULT1A1 genetic variants on drug metabolism and therapeutic efficacy.

Keywords: CNV, genotype, phenotype, SULT1A1, single nucleotide polymorphisms

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