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Comparison of survival outcomes between radical hysterectomy and definitive radiochemotherapy in stage IB1 and IIA1 cervical cancer

Authors Wu SG, Zhang WW, He ZY, Sun JY, Wang Y, Zhou J

Received 9 July 2017

Accepted for publication 1 November 2017

Published 11 December 2017 Volume 2017:9 Pages 813—819

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CMAR.S145926

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Amy Norman

Peer reviewer comments 4

Editor who approved publication: Dr Antonella D'Anneo


San-Gang Wu,1,* Wen-Wen Zhang,2,* Zhen-Yu He,2 Jia-Yuan Sun,2 Yan Wang,3 Juan Zhou3

1Department of Radiation Oncology, Xiamen Cancer Hospital, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, People’s Republic of China

*These authors contributed equally to this work

Introduction: There is an ongoing debate regarding the optimal local treatment modalities for stage IB1 and IIA1 cervical cancer. The aim of this study was to determine whether radical hysterectomy or definitive radiochemotherapy is superior in stage IB1 and IIA1 cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC).
Methods: From 1990 to 2010, a total of 3,769 patients with stage IB1 and IIA1 cervical SCC were included from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database and were stratified according to whether they received radical hysterectomy or primary radiochemotherapy. Propensity score-matching (PSM) methods were used to balance patient baseline characteristics. Cancer-specific survival (CSS) and overall survival (OS) were compared between the two groups.
Results: Of the 3,769 patients, 3,653 (96.9%) and 116 (3.1%) patients received radical hysterectomy and definitive radiochemotherapy, respectively. Radiochemotherapy was rarely used for definitive treatment prior to 2000. Before PSM, patients who were older, of black ethnicity, and with larger tumor size and stage IIA1 disease were more likely to receive definitive radiochemotherapy. A total of 116 pairs were completely matched using PSM. The local treatment modalities had no effect on CSS or OS in either unmatched or matched populations. In the matched population, the 8-year CSS rates were 82.1% and 76.5% in surgery and radiochemotherapy groups, respectively (p=0.382). The 8-year OS rates were 74.6% and 67.8% in surgery and radiochemotherapy groups, respectively (p=0.205).
Conclusion: Our population-based study suggests that there is no clear local treatment of choice on survival outcomes between radical hysterectomy and definitive radiochemotherapy in patients with stage IB1 and IIA1 cervical SCC.

Keywords: cervical cancer, early stage, hysterectomy, radiotherapy, propensity score matching

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