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Clinical utility of voriconazole eye drops in ophthalmic fungal keratitis

Authors Daoud Al-Badriyeh, Chin Fen Neoh, Kay Stewart, et al

Published 3 May 2010 Volume 2010:4 Pages 391—405

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S6374

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Peer reviewer comments 3

Daoud Al-Badriyeh, Chin Fen Neoh, Kay Stewart, David CM Kong

Centre for Medicine Use and Safety, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Victoria, Australia

Abstract: Fungal keratitis is one of the major causes of ophthalmic mycosis and is difficult to treat. The range of common antifungal agents available for fungal keratitis remains inadequate and is generally associated with poor clinical outcomes. Voriconazole is a new generation triazole antifungal agent. Only marketed in systemic formulation and, with broad-spectrum activity and high intraocular penetration, voriconazole has demonstrated effectiveness against fungal keratitis. Systemic voriconazole, however, is not without side effects and is costly. Voriconazole eye drops have been prepared extemporaneously and used for the treatment of ophthalmic fungal keratitis. The current article sought to review the literature for evidence related to the effectiveness and safety of topical voriconazole and its corneal penetration into the aqueous humor of the eye. The voriconazole eye drops used are typically of 1% concentration, well tolerated by the eye, and are stable. Despite existing evidence to suggest that the eye drops are effective in the treatment of fungal keratitis, more studies are needed, especially in relation to using the eye drops as first-line and stand-alone treatment, preparation of higher concentrations, and optimal dosing frequency.
Keywords: voriconazole, fungal keratitis, eye drops, corneal penetration

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