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Challenges faced in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults

Authors Levine S, McNeer J, Isakoff M

Received 27 August 2015

Accepted for publication 13 November 2015

Published 15 February 2016 Volume 2016:6 Pages 11—20

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/COAYA.S61424

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Dr Mark Kieran


Selena R Levine,1 Jennifer L McNeer,2 Michael S Isakoff1

1Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Connecticut Children’s Medical Center and University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Hartford, CT, 2Section of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, University of Chicago Comer Children's Hospital, Chicago, IL, USA

Abstract: The survival rate for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has dramatically improved over the last 50 years. However, for those in the adolescent and young adult (AYA) age-group of 15–30 years with ALL, there has not been the same degree of improvement. Historically, pediatric and adult providers have utilized different treatment approaches based on clinical trials. However, studies that have compared the outcome of AYA patients with ALL treated on pediatric or adult clinical trials have generally shown substantially better outcomes for this patient population treated with the pediatric trials. Additionally, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been considered as part of intensified therapy for AYA patients with ALL. Herein, we review the outcomes with chemotherapy alone and with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and explore the challenges faced in determining the ideal therapy for the AYA population of patients.

Keywords:
adolescent young adult oncology, leukemia, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

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