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Cervical cancer screening in Nepal: ethical considerations

Authors Gyawali B, Keeling J, van Teijlingen E, Dhakal L, Aro AR

Received 14 November 2014

Accepted for publication 2 December 2014

Published 16 January 2015 Volume 2015:5 Pages 1—6

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/MB.S77507

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Bethany Spielman

Bishal Gyawali,1 June Keeling,2 Edwin van Teijlingen,3 Liladhar Dhakal,4 Arja R Aro1

1Unit for Health Promotion Research, University of Southern Denmark, Esbjerg, Denmark; 2Faculty of Health and Social Care, University of Chester, Bebington, 3Centre for Midwifery, Maternal and Perinatal Health, Bournemouth University, UK; 4Health for Life Project, Lalitpur, Kathmandu, Nepal

Abstract: Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths for women worldwide. Cervical screening and early treatment can help to prevent cervical cancers. Cervical screening programs in Nepal are often associated with a number of socioeconomic, cultural, and ethical challenges. This paper discusses some central ethical challenges in providing cervical cancer screening in the Nepalese context and culture. It is necessary to address these challenges for successful implementation of such screening programs.

Keywords: public health screening, ethics, women, South Asia

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