Back to Journals » Veterinary Medicine: Research and Reports » Volume 3

cDNA cloning and mRNA expression of cat and dog Cdkal1

Authors Yamamoto, Shingo Ishikawa, Li Gebin, Hiroshi Takemitsu, Megumi Fujiwara, Nobuko Mori, Yutaka Hatano, Tomoko Suzuki, Mori, Nobuhiro Nakao, Kawasumi K, Sako T, Arai T

Received 28 May 2012

Accepted for publication 3 July 2012

Published 13 August 2012 Volume 2012:3 Pages 65—69

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/VMRR.S32540

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3


Ichiro Yamamoto, Shingo Ishikawa, Li Gebin, Hiroshi Takemitsu, Megumi Fujiwara, Nobuko Mori, Yutaka Hatano, Tomoko Suzuki, Akihiro Mori, Nobuhiro Nakao, Koh Kawasumi, Toshinori Sako, Toshiro Arai

Laboratory of Veterinary Biochemistry, Nippon Veterinary and Life Science University, Tokyo, Japan

Abstract: The cyclin-dependent kinase 5 regulatory subunit–associated protein 1–like 1 (CDKAL1) gene encodes methylthiotransferase, and the gene contains risk variants for type 2 diabetes in humans. In this study, we performed complementary DNA cloning for Cdkal1 in the cat and dog and characterized the tissue expression profiles of its messenger RNA. Cat and dog Cdkal1 complementary DNA encoded 576 and 578 amino acids, showing very high sequence homology to mammalian CDKAL1 (>88.4%). Real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that Cdkal1 messenger RNA is highly expressed in smooth muscle and that tissue distribution of Cdkal1 is similar in cats and dogs. Genotyping analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphism for cat Cdkal1 revealed that obese cats had different tendencies from normal cats. These findings suggest that the cat and dog Cdkal1 gene is highly conserved among mammals and that cat Cdkal1 may be a candidate marker for genetic diagnosis of obesity.

Keywords: cat, dog, Cdkal1, obese, cDNA cloning, Q-PCR

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]