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Canine parvoviral enteritis: an update on the clinical diagnosis, treatment, and prevention

Authors Mylonakis M, Kalli I, Rallis T

Received 12 March 2016

Accepted for publication 7 May 2016

Published 11 July 2016 Volume 2016:7 Pages 91—100

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/VMRR.S80971

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Colin Mak

Peer reviewer comments 5

Editor who approved publication: Professor Young Lyoo


Mathios E Mylonakis, Iris Kalli, Timoleon S Rallis
 
Companion Animal Clinic, School of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece 
 
Abstract: Canine parvovirus type 2 is the cause of a highly contagious acute enteritis associated with high morbidity and mortality, with very low survival rates in untreated dogs. Although severe clinical disease typically occurs in dogs younger than 6 months of age, adults with insufficient immunity may potentially be affected. In this article, the current state of knowledge is reviewed regarding the diagnostic aspects of parvoviral enteritis, with special emphasis placed on the clinical relevance of the detection of viral antigens in the feces, detection of viral antibodies in the serum, or the polymerase chain reaction-based amplification of the viral DNA in the feces. In addition, the components of the supportive and symptomatic treatment aiming to optimize the outcome of the disease in the clinical setting are thoroughly reviewed. Immunization guidelines for the prevention of the disease are also updated.
 
Keywords: dog, parvovirus type 2, acute enteritis, treatment, vaccination

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