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Blood genotyping for improved outcomes in chronic transfusion patients: current and future perspectives

Authors Kutner J, Mota M, Conti F, Castilho L

Received 28 April 2014

Accepted for publication 16 June 2014

Published 4 September 2014 Volume 2014:2 Pages 65—72

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IJCTM.S48394

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 5


Jose Mauro Kutner,1 Mariza Mota,1 Fabiana Conti,1 Lilian Castilho1,2

1Hemotherapy and Cell Therapy Department, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP, Brazil; 2Hemocentro Unicamp, Campinas, SP, Brazil

Abstract: Blood transfusions are life sustaining in chronically transfused patients. However, certain complications, such as alloimmunization to red blood cells, can create challenges in the management of those patients. Routine phenotyping of blood recipients and the use of phenotype-matched blood units for transfusion have been useful to lower the occurrence of red cell alloantibodies in chronically transfused individuals. Nevertheless, extensive phenotyping is expensive, laborious, and cannot be performed in certain situations. The molecular understanding of blood groups has enabled the design of assays that may be used to better guide matched red blood cell transfusions. This review summarizes key findings related to red cell alloimmunization, the already identified and potential future benefits of blood group genotyping, and how molecular typing is being incorporated in the blood bank's routine to improve clinical and long-term outcomes in chronically transfused patients.

Keywords: blood group genotyping, chronically transfused patients, platelet genotyping, RBC alloimmunization

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